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Hide and Seek

(Open Your Bibles to John 9)

Have you ever had to hide your eyes when playing Hide and Seek? Did it seem like a very long time before you could uncover your eyes and look for your playmates? What if you never again could uncover your eyes, and suddenly you were transformed into a constant land of Pin the Tail on the Donkey? You would then start to understand the land of the blind, but not the land of those who are born blind. This land is so very hard to understand, because in this land you never see anything before your eyes are covered.

If you never had seen the color blue, how would you describe blue to anyone else? When you leave your friends and your parents to go to summer camp or to visit your grandparents, your visit might be long enough to cause you to want to see a picture of those you left back at home to remind you how they look. If you live in the land of congenital blindness (blind from birth), you would never have seen the faces of your parents and friends and you couldn’t see the picture to remind you how they look. 

Congenital blindness is very rare. Some towns do not have even one child who is blind and even if they do, it might not be congenital.  Jesus met a man who was blind from birth, and to show the greatness of God, He cured him. This miracle remains as great today as it was two thousand years ago, because modern medicine cannot cure congenital blindness. Eighty percent of all blindness can be avoided or corrected, but not congenital blindness. Jesus said that this man was not blind because of the sin of his parents or himself. Jesus placed mud on the man’s eyes and told him to wash in the pool of Siloam. The man obeyed and was cured. How amazing to obey a stranger that you never saw. Rather than rejoicing with this man and his parents, the leaders of the Jews unfairly criticized Jesus for performing this miracle on the Sabbath. Take a moment to rejoice over your sight the next time you play Hide and Seek!


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